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RWL KTM NP: 18Oct2005/28Oct2005/30Oct2005/01NOV2005updated

CAIRN DRAFT STATUTES DOC / CONFIDENTIAL SUBMITTED FOR CONSULTATION TO :

Prof. M. Singleton, UCL/POLS/ANSO/LAAP UCL/LLN Be

Fr. B. Robins SJ, SXC KTM NP

Prof. Ian Clegg, ex UWS/CDS Swansea Wales UK

Other CAIRN partners, at later stage (…)

ATTENTION PLS:

The following entry is a confidential note issued from Prof. Mike Singleton UCL/POLS/ANSO/LAAP  to CAIRN Doctorate School short-listed potential Supervision Board Members, re: ECTS credits> (26 Oct 2005)

Dear Ian CLEGG, HMJ and Fr. ROBINS SJ,

In his recent feedback to the present draft consultation, Prof. Mike SINGLETON (UCL/POLS/LAAP) said that he found the document excellent and convincing. He suggests as background the blanket formula on the lines that:  "current ECTS requirements for a university degree - Masters, Doctorate will hold for the present program, but the enrolment in exceptional cases can also be based upon evidence of sufficient or equivalent scholarity, and especially of experience, if possible (quoted)." 

The CAIRN Supervision Board would give assessment to PD Project submission based on each file ("sur dossier", as they say in UCL). Or if specifics are absolutely required, he suggests that consulting the UWS or UCL faculty sites for requirements will provide a more clear idea of the number of ECTS in each respective geographic units program.

Mike added to this (quoted Date: Wed, 26 Oct 2005 : ‘…The quantities of ECTS seem more or less exact "from memory" to me - BUT in the final draft we must be absolutely sure we are aligned on official normas in the field (supposing they exist europe-wide, europewise) – to avoid like the pest any eventual misunderstandings or miss-pass both with our eventual "clients" or with the powers that academically be.  So try and make sure the norms you quote really do answer to or echo what is the official standard (again supposing there is one - above and beyond what individual countries or even individual universities deem should be the case)… “. signed: Mike (end quote)
This is indeed what is in process now, more later… RWL

  

U ALL READ THIS FIRST PLEASE!!!!!!! / THE ECTS > A REMINDERS HERE:

CAIRN proposed ECTS/ECDL Professional Thesis (P-D) credits and research layout!

The CAIRN Consortium Joint Professional Doctorate and Postgraduate is a multilingual, interdisciplinary, inter-university postgraduate ECTS/ECDL EU/Asia academic collaboration programme which will provide high quality academic education and professional competences for personnel working or intending to work in the area of prospective development anthropology and counselling, including upgraded tools in HRD, ICT-,NGOs organization management, personal development, psychology, energotherapy and other related developmental skills. It will bring together Asian and Western students and researchers of both an academic and professional background into persuing a flexible menu divided into two parts: a first part 90 ECTS/ECDL credits related to the theoretical knowledge added, followed by the second part Cultural Immersion - Action Research linked to research practical skills of 150 credits, towards the completion of 240 ECTS credits for a Professional Thesis (PD) Diploma.

The joint programme will be offered on the new CAIRN MEDIACASTING PORTAL by the following Network of established academic units and professional training NGOs:

- SXC  SXSSC - (Fr. Robins SJ) - KTM NP

- UCL/POLS/ANSO/LAAP (Mike Singleton)

- UWS (Ian Clegg)?

- SWA COLLEGE (HMJ)?

- NIHS (Prof. Gartoulla) - KTM NP

- BAZRA College ?

- ISI-CNV (Dr. Marco Paret) - Nice - FR

- more...

The content of the theoretical knowledge equivalent to the Erasmus Masters level is split into five main parts: a) Intensive Programme Component (5 ECTS credits), b) Core Course (25 ECTS credits) in the university where graduates registered, c) Orientation Period (30 ECTS credits) in another university of the Network, d)  Work Placement Component (30 ECTS credits) in Network university and/or international organizations, e) the Field-Research per se (150 ECTS credits), towards the completion of 240 ECTS credits for a Professional Thesis (PD) Diploma.

Admission criteria: a) Participants must have completed a good level first cycle degree in a discipline of relevance, b) Candidates are required to have a recognized level of proficiency in the language(s) of instruction, c) Motivation and research/work experience.

 

What is ECTS?

ECTS, the European Community Credit Transfer System, was developed by the European Commission in order to provide common procedures to guarantee academic recognition of studies abroad.  It provides a way of measuring and comparing learning achievements, and transferring them from one institution to another.

In ECTS, 60 credits represent the workload of a year of study: normally 30 credits are given for a semester and 20 credits for a term.  It is important that no special courses are set up for ECTS purposes, but that all ECTS courses are mainstream courses of the participating institutions, as followed by home students under normal regulations.

All courses are measured in credits, one credit unit referring to an input of approximately 40 overall hours of work by the student. This workload includes all the requirements for a course: not only attending lectures, but also the time spent studying privately. The average number of credits completed in one semester is 30-40 ECTS credits.

The Bachelor's degree requires 240 ECTS and the Master's degree 320 ECTS.

Development of a European study programme / curriculum at postgraduate level (cycle III) leading to a professional doctorate (upon completion of 180 ECTS credits) or a PhD (240 ECTS credits).

At both highest academic and professional level (“state of the art”), this modularised curriculum should enable graduates to meet the enormous expectations (prospective) teacher educators are supposed to fulfil in our dynamic learning societies.

IE: modularised curriculum for prospective teacher educators at which students may opt for two compatible routes:

·  a European professional doctorate in teaching and teacher education may be obtained after successful completion of 180 ECTS credits, and

·  a European PhD in teaching and teacher education after successful completion of 240 ECTS credits

 

 

 

PROPOSED DRAFT MoU TO BE CONTERSIGNED AT LATER DATE BY ALL CAIRN PARTNERS

MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING (MOU)

BETWEEN THE SIGNATORIES :

 

The signatories, namely:... Prof. Mike Singleton, Prof. Ian Clegg, FR. W. Robins SJ, HMJ, RWL,

...

hereby agree to (setup/implement/review and extend) this memorandum of understanding (MoU) signed on (date): ..................          2005

This MoU agreement is based on the principle of reciprocity and expresses the interest of all parties in setting-up a Professional Doctorate School (PD Thesis) for exchanging EU and Asia postgraduate scholars, students, information and materials in the belief that the research and educational process in strategic sites will be help to foster mutual understanding and collaboration between the East and West, and further promote education and action research in the selected areas quoted here below:

  1. The signatories agree to encourage the development of the following exchange programs based on their respective expertise, as well as academic and educational needs and context:

 


  1. The parties recognize that the implementation of any exchange program will depend upon the academic interests and expertise of the individual members in selected any supervision, and upon the availability of financial resources.  Accordingly, the implementation of each research project  based on this agreement shall be separately negotiated on an PROJECT AD HOC basis and determined by the academic parties involved, including their eventual units boards.

 

  1. This MoU agreement is not intended to be a legally binding document.  It is meant to describe the process for SETTING UP THE RATIONALE AND ORGANIZING THE PROFESSIONAL DOCTORATE SCHOOL EXCHANGE PLATFORM and to suggest the guidelines of the cooperation described hereunder.  Nothing therefore shall diminish the full autonomy of either person, units or institution, nor will any constraints be imposed by either upon the other in carrying out the agreement.


  1. The MoU agreement shall become effective on the day all partners affix their signatures and seals, will be in force for a period of 05 years, and is subject to revision or modification by mutual agreement under the here defined Supervision Board.  It is also understood that any member may terminate his/her collaboration to the agreement at any time, although it is assumed that such action would only be taken after mutual consultation in order to avoid any possible inconvenience to the other members or institution.

 

  1. For the purpose of accountable and transparent collaboration, the coordinator/liaison officer is hereunder named: RWL. He shall serve as liaison officer for this MoU agreement.

This text is open to suggestions, amendments, corrections, etc...

 

 

PROPOSED GENERAL  AIMS   UNDER THE MoU  FOR EVENTUAL EC- BUDGET:

 

PROJECT FACTS SHEET

 

Component : Institutional & Systems Development ?

Area(s) of Activity : Cultural Immersion, Mediacasting and Distance Online Education

Lead Applicant : CAIRN SXC (Nepal)

Partners :

Project Location : EU, UK, USA, Canada, Nepal, Tibet/China and Nepal

General Aims:

The general aims of the CAIRN academic exchange network are:


1) - The general
aim of this project is to provide an integrated cultural immersion cum online education action-research model, field-training options and hands-on experience of multimedia distributed learning materials for European and Asian Postgraduate (ECTS / ECDL credits) and Professional Doctorate (PD) academic exchange. The target groups are postgraduate researchers, HEIs/NGOs and SMEs trainees, administrators, academics, technical/networking staff and selected traditional health practitioners. CAIRN ICT-/VLE technical experts in UK are  working on the development of Open Source solutions to networking technologies, as a sustainable and cost effective way towards Adult Continuous Education Open Learning.

2) - The second aim of the project is to focus on systems that are easily accessible to local target-site target-groups, ie: youth, scholars, local schools traditional health practitioners, foreign researchers, etc..., in short to extend the online Mediacasting advantages to NGOs, SMEs, PHC/THWs and higher education institutions (HEIs).

3) - To make available experiential seminars, e-learning multimedia courses, Himalayan region cultural immersion study, counselling (webcam or in situ), postgraduate (ECTS) certification and professional research thesis (PD) supervision in Asia, for the renewed comparative approach in the fields of Prospective Anthropology, Health Anthropology, Crisis Prevention Counselling, Education Counselling, Humanitarian Assistance Training, etc. This includes more particularly some of the dedicated areas of CAIRN research being:  Applied Psychology and Energo-therapy research in the relations between the Ancient Keltic, Yoga, Shamanic, Qi-Qong and Tibetan Traditional Healing Arts, as well as ongoing transmission Tsa-rLung Healing Practices, for potential Modern-life Personal Development Applications;

4) - Mediacasting Multimedia Portal Applications in the development of  EU- Postgraduate ECDL/ECTS and Professional Doctorate (PD) certifications,

5) - Multimedia Dbase and Mediacasting (webcam) News Portal for Online Counselling;
 

These aims also include the publishing of research literature and video documentaries, as well as arranging options in Cultural Immersion Studies, Online Learning, Seminars and Conferences for the experiential study of the points above.

CAIRN Orgyen Gyaltsen e-Center is a recognized EU-NGO for Adult Education R&D in Anthropology, Heath Education, Tibetan Traditional Medicine, Applied Psychology and Energotherapy, affiliated with the SXC, SXSSC and Dudjom Gompa in KTM Nepal, and the UCL/LAAP (Be), ISI-CNV in Nice (FR), UWS (UK) and other EU- HEI Units.

 

REM: New  draft- MEDIACASTING PORTAL pages links to Tibetan Tsa-rLung Yoga (please U click!)

http://cairn-alliance.tripod.com/testportal.html

http://cairn-alliance.tripod.com/healinglama.html

http://cairn-alliance.tripod.com/namgyalweb.html

draft only!

 

 

SUB:
DRAFT STATUTES CONSTITUTION FOR SETTING-UP OF PROFESSIONAL THESIS BOARD (PD)



REM:
CAIRN ERASMUS HOMEPAGE 2004 is at: http://cairn-erasmus.tripod.com/
CAIRN TESTPORTAL MEDIA-CASTING DRAFT at : http://cairn-alliance.tripod.com/testportal.html
CAIRN INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS (NP VISA) is at: http://cairn-ukps.tripod.com/conditions.htm



CONTENT:

I - DRAFT- MEMORANDUM (MoU) 2005-06

II- ABSTRACT

III- DRAFT- STATUTES

1-       REMINDER:

2-       FURTHER COMMENTS

3-       CAIRN PROFESSIONAL THESIS BOARD SET-UP BACKGROUND :

4-       FORESEEN ACADEMIC BOARD MEMBERS (as per country/discipline/availability)

5-       STATUTES PROPOSED FRAMEWORK: (CAIRN Framework for Professional Doctorates)

6-       PROF- THESIS (PD) PROJECT DESIGN & CONSTRUCTION (PLAN):

7-       ENTRY REQUIREMENTS:

8-       PROGRAMME MANAGEMENT

9-       ASSESMENT (Certification)

10-   DRAFT- MoU (Memorandum of Understanding Agreement) updated Protocole 2005

I - DRAFT- MEMORANDUM AGREEMENT (MoU) 2005-06

(…)

 REM: TO BE DRAFTED AS UNDER EITHER,

A- BELGIUM EU-NGO LAW, this draft is! ready!

B- FRENCH LOI 1901 ASBL TRAINING, draft ready!

C- UK BASED EU-NGO, to be done with IC and HMJ in UWS!!!

II- ABSTRACT

CAIRN

Cairn Erasmus is a personalized cultural immersion e-learning and communication gateway for parents, teachers, and postgraduate research students. It offers selected online courses and field-research resources focused on Asian and postgraduate research students. It offers selected online courses and field-research resources focused on Asian Humanitarian Intervention, Clinical Anthropology, Prospective Anthropology, Tibetan Traditional Healing Psychotherapy, Counselling, Remediation, etc... Being certified as Cross-cultural Awareness Postgraduate personal research or training projects, within a flexible menu, Cairn options are organized from the SXC/Cairn KTM selected resources, based in Nepal, northern India, Tibet TAR China, Canada, USA, UK and EU.

Cairn Academic Coaching is a personalized program and is offered one-on-one by appointment.

CAIRN offers a rigorous but flexible program of experiential cultural immersion study options, grounded on the methodology of Adult Continuous Education Mixed Mode ECTS/ECDL Certification and e-Learning resources in the integrated fields of Health Anthropology, Humanitarian Assistance, Applied Psychology to Counselling and Tibetan Medicine Energo-therapy. Based on the comparative approach of the Tibetan Nyingma tradition, it is enriched with studies and practices from other faiths, practices and philosophies, such as the Qi Qong, Tao, Keltic, Shamanic and Yogas healing traditions, as well as western science, pedagogy, psychology and organizational leadership training methods.

The curriculum follows levels of a stepwise knowledge and embodiment coursework, designed to develop a fully qualified practice in ethical organizational leadership, healing and counselling. The levels correspond to EU Postgraduate and Professional Doctorate levels study. Serious students who don't want to complete the whole curriculum and people non interested in certification, per se, but would like to follow CAIRN Experiential Tours & Study practices are also welcome to participate.


A-      Cairn Mission Statement

The Mission of Cairn Consortium is to:
- offer high- education curriculum and field-research options, in tailored joint- programs that promote and cultivate Euro-Asia cross-cultural awareness of the present moment through the intellectual study of the heritage, the know-how of technical skills, the embodiment through artistic and meditative disciplines, and pursuance in a recognized European ECTS/ECDL certification partnership;
- foster an Asian/Himalayan focused experiential learning community (composed of EU students, faculty, staff, trustees, and alumni) that uncovers wisdom and heart;
- cultivate openness and communication, sharpen critical intellect, enhance resourcefulness, and develop effective action in all related disciplines;
- exemplify the principles grounded in the Humanities of both educational heritages;
- encourage the integration of traditional healing root- traditions in the modern world.

Because the offered Joint- Postgraduate/Masters Courses must already in existence and must be fully operational at the time of a European university Consortium application to the Erasmus Mundus programme, Cairn Consortium already implements most of the options listed above as a self-sustainable joint-venture based on students personal Cultural Immersion project requests, thus fulfilling the necessary minimum preparatory activities.

An EC-/Erasmus Mundus Programme Joint-Masters Course must consist of an integrated study programme. All of these features must be fulfilled at the time of application and described in the application in technical detail. As regards the delivery of a double/multiple or joint degree, the Commission accepts an exception to this rule for the 2004 and 2005 selection rounds only: if a consortium cannot guarantee the awarding of a double/multiple or joint degree at the time of application, it has to add a declaration that it is able to do so at the time of selection (early September 2004 for the Call for Proposals relating to the academic year 2004/2005; January 2005 for the Call for Proposals relating to the academic year 2005/2006). This declaration will be checked against its truthfulness before taking a selection decision. In case of non-fulfillment of this criterion the application will be rejected.

Most of those institutional requirements thus reside in the ability and stamina of concerned European partners to abide in due time to the prior-conditions presented in the EC-Guidelines.

Cairn/SXC Consortium HQ in KTM/Nepal can only serve the purpose of striving to become a suitable Asian/LDC platform, as required for the Asian part from the EC- Guidelines.

Beyond these academic and motivational requirements, participants will need to have the ability to work from their own initiative within a diversified cultural context and within target-communities, where fruitful relations are based on mutual trust and respect. Honesty, adaptability, openness, and tolerance are essential qualities.

Cairn organizes this programme in order to facilitate the access, for EU- and American researchers, development professionals and postgraduate students, to strategic
Euro-Asia Trans-cultural Counselling Field- Research & Courses Options
in Nepal, India, Tibet/TAR China and S-Asia.

Options include training resources in Post- Development Policies, Rehabilitation, Crisis Prevention and Remediation, Vocational, Career and/or Educational Counselling, Education online, Investigation Journalism or simple Volunteer projects, as well as more indepth training experiential in healing and psychotherapy in Tibetan Traditional Medicine Psychology (Tsa-rLung Healing). These can be linked easily to the participants academic background within disciplines such as : Clinical Anthropology, Health Anthropology, Social/Health Education, Applied Psychology to Counselling, Ethno-medicine, Phenomenology, Transpersonal (Holistic) Psychotherapy, as well as Applied Psychology to HRD and Organization Management.

A short list of high quality online training resources and highly qualified practitioners has been selected in situ, for designing, delivering, coaching and facilitating the inputs at the various professional levels required for ECTS/ECDL credits in professional training research certification.



B- Strategic Asian Target-site(s) Location

Situated in the strategic site of Boddhnath Stupa ( KTM Valley Nepal), itself a crossroad and a renown pilgrimage powerplace, Cairn Consortium is at the core of the Himalayan region outstanding beauty, as well as immerged into local religious, cultural, commercial and (post-) development issues. As a Regional HEIs/NGOs Network, Cairn also has other selected partners located in North India (Sarnath, Varanasi, Delhi and Tsopema HP), Tibet - TAR (Nyalam, Lhasa, Kham) and China (Shanghai), Thailand, Burma (Myanmar) and Bali...

From their learning, seeing, talking, listening, practicing, experiencing, travelling and discussing – Cairn programme participants will emerge from their stay with a different view of Asia, of their home country and also perhaps of themselves. For some, this will have been their first encounter with Nepalese, Tibetans or Chinese, and they will return home with much to ponder. Perhaps for some others the greatest reward will have been the friendships established with other participants, and with the local people and youth they got to know. Regardless of the respective backgrounds, Cairn will have been a meeting place for some of the brightest and most interesting students and will be remembered and valued for the rest of their lives.

Personalized project's tutoring/coaching will enhance participant’s ability to understand
their experiential, as being Gestalts immersed in a broad geopolitical eco-social structure,
its symbolic efficacy and ongoing cultural changes, for which appraisal most Europeans
and Asians similarly are often ill-prepared.

The Cairn Euro-Asian Cross-cultural Awareness Volunteer Programme has a genuine cross-cultural immersion learning and research experience as its main goal. As an innovative initiative in Euro-Asia university and High Education Institutions (HEIs) linkages, this platform is widely regarded as timely and appropriate, provided that key element of its strategy be refocused as much on the future of sustainable and relevant high education exchange niches, than addressing Asian LDCs pressing priorities and bringing more awareness on Nepal dramatic current issues. This innovative programme is accordingly the only one of its kind, which links European researchers with strategic sites selected in the Himalayan region and places them accordingly at grassroots in a most favorable position to assess the prospective of Asia. While on the one hand, it addresses the future relations of Europe with Asia LDCs emerging economies and the result of imported development policies, Cairn also seeks for innovative, beneficial and ethical personal development avenues within the rich traditional, philosophical and cultural heritage of the Himalayas, which as tools in terms of attitude, knowledge and decision-making process may lead to better understanding, mutual respect and collaboration.

With activities being organized under the legal umbrella of registered local HEIs and non-profit organizations (NGOs), such as the St-Xavier Campus(SXC), St-Xavier's Social Services Center

(SXSSC), Nepal Institute for Health Science (NIHS), RECID (TU/IOM), KUNPHEN Tibetan Medical Center, KAILASH Tibetan Medical Center (Amchi Jampa), and/or other selected intervenors and community support groups, Cairn offers a unique choice of true experiential and professional opportunities for thesis researchers, postgraduate students, professionals and/or international volunteers, including the possibility to enjoy the amazing beauty of the Himalayan region nature, rich culture and real involvement with people in daily life.

Given that this programme is fundamentally about creating and expanding new and sustainable structural opportunities for students, researchers and trainees to share and upgraded their knowledge, attitude and awareness, it will remain flexible and based upon students projects, within a Menu of Open Learning ECTS/ECDL Options. While the present set of priorities range from ‘Human Resource Development’ (HRD), ‘e-Marketing Online Curriculum Development’ and other technical market-driven categorisations, emphasis is being brought to cover areas being: Social/Health Anthropology, Clinical Anthropology, Psychotherapy, Ethnomedicine, Drug Abuse Counselling Training, Tsa-rLung Tibetan Medicine Energotherapy, Tantras, Philosophy, Languages, Arts & Humanities, Investigation Journalism and other more precise topics which may be developed without limitations by students or trainees in order to address their objectives.

Responding to the needs of future relations between Europe and Asia, Cairn Erasmus will seek, encourage and support Projects that reflect the urgent need for more awareness on LDCs priorities. For doing so, it has taken steps since several years to gather a core of respected/experienced EU and Asian scholars and interveners, who all are involved on a daily basis in universities and NGOs services in/with least developed Asian countries (LDC) and who bring the much needed constructive but critical appraisal tools and resources for an effective cooperation. While focusing on the evaluation of the past for fostering the future, Cairn original approach is in the two-fold nature of its Curriculum Options studying as much the European and Asian spiritual heritage values, than personality or modern e-technology.

Following the recent European Commission decisions, the new Erasmus Mundus programme  partnerships will be developed to strengthen European/Asian co-operation and international links in higher education by supporting high-quality European/Asian Joint-curriculum Masters Courses, enabling students and visiting scholars to engage in postgraduate study at European universities, as well as by encouraging the outgoing mobility of European students and scholars towards third Asian countries.

The CAIRN new scheme will proceed using both Cultural Immersion (Tour&Study in selected strategic sites in Asia), as well as the usual combination of online courses, lectures, seminars, group work and practical fieldwork, including a dissertation. Students will be continuously assessed by tutors online on the basis of their essays, report writing and presentation of portfolios. There are no examinations for this programme, as the final aim is based on personalized experiential and tailored project which fulfillment will require genuine and continuous efforts on the ground...




C- Euro-Asian Doctorate Studies (Professional):

CAIRN Doctorate degrees are based on the EU directives governing Professional Doctorate / Adult Continous Education / Open Learning credits, gained by participants presenting a Doctorate Thesis project which conceptual, experiential and methodological requirements are achieved through a flexible accumulation of ECTS/ECDL credits in the fields of ICT- Arts&Therapy and Humanities Field-Studies.

Suitable experienced candidates can be admitted for a Professional Doctorate Thesis in subjects, such as: Euro-Asian Education Exchange Marketing and Promotion Strategy Prospective (HEIs, NGOs and SMEs), the use of e-learning Multimedia Database for Humanitarian Assistance training development, field-studies in Philosophy, Traditional Health, Ethnomedicine, Clinical Anthropology and/or Shamanism.

The thesis link to traditional health phenomenology and to CHOWs training, within their hermeneutics, geo-political, religious and social dimensions for services delivery, will be particularly encouraged.

Cairn organizes Professional Doctorate Thesis (ECTS/ECDL) from the opportunity provided by Directives for EU Continuous Education (Professional Training) wit a training content based on applicants previous professional experience or renewed interest.

There are already hundreds of examples of Open Learning Online, Continuous Adult Education and Professional Postgraduates and Doctorates within the EU and British universities, not mentioning Private Education Providers in USA, Canada, Australia and UK.

However, none so far, have designed an integrated framework of options being a cost-effective flexible menu of EU certified credits from an experts academic units network collaboration, and being affordable for answering the specific needs and priorities of students and trainees in Nepal/S-Asia.

Even less is being done so far for answering the EU researchers or students interest in Traditional Health or Philosophy from serious academic resources in Nepal, in such areas of ongoing studies in the Arts & Humanities, as Dharma, Tibetan Philosophy, Ethno-medicine or Himalayan Traditional Health.

This is why Cairn Consortium, in collaboration with the SXC/SXSSC has initiated a new platform for academic exchange and field-studies, including VLE resources with courses online, videos streaming and education counselling database, from a selection of genuine key- resources, persons and infrastructures in situ.

 



D- The key features of Cairn Postgraduate and Doctorate degrees are:

a- the titles are different from MSc or PhD – they directly refer to a particular
field-expertise or profession, for which credits are being gained by applicants
who submit a personal project for a Professional Postgraduate or Doctorate
in areas of their previous professional experience or renewed interest,
such as: EdD (education), DBA (business management) , DHA
(health anthropology) , DEC (education counselling) and other
open disciplines certification.

b- these are designed for experienced professionals who want to do
a PhD part-time while remaining at work and who want to proceed
through a personalized accumulation of credits certificates.

c- their aim is to make an original contribution to professional
knowledge and professional practice through a Thesis.

d- they are studied in the work-place on an actual problem occurring
in the local community, as well as allow short intensive Summer and
Winter Campus organized in the EU (min 3 weeks, max 3 months),
and, of course, Cultural Immersion Field-studies in Nepal/S-Asia.

e- they naturally involve action research and stepwise ethnographic
investigation, from which (consensual diagnosis) a problem is identified,
an intervention project designed is initiated, some possible solutions are
devised and implemented. The joint-supervision allows effectiveness
to be monitored by experts in the field, so as to comply with
EU academic requirements.

f- as there is a significant conceptual, methodological and know-how
taught component in each individual project, material and references
are brought online. This allows the development of knowledge in a most
flexible and cost-effective manner in-situ, provides a focus-group cohort
identity, allow the teaching of research methods, propose the provision
of extended open menu of related subject training, allows an easy online
sharing of experience and methodologies through forum, and encourage
de visu (face-to-face) collective debate on common issues, experiences
and relevance of each research topic through focused Seminars in
the specific profession or training involved.
(for more details, kindly click here!)



E- Cultural Immersion and Field-studies

CAIRN also promotes non-credits cultural immersion tours cum experiential field-studies in clinical anthropology, ethno-medicine and counselling intervention research organized for EU scholars and professionals in Nepal, India and the Himalayan region.
CAIRN(Nepal) Cultural Immersion and Field-studies for EU scholars being interested in the Himalayan region, S-Asia and Nepal equation, may focus on current Euro-Asian geo-political issues, including the history, hermeneutics and representations prevailing upon local paradigm.
Finally, CAIRN(Nepal) also provides resources online and consultancy to local schools, NGOs and SMEs (Small and Medium Entreprises).

CAIRN Cultural Immersion Innovative Pedagogy presents several tailored options.
(ie: Tentative Itinerary & Process)

During 28 days minimum and to upto 4-5 months maximum, motivated high school students or researchers being gathered from various parts of Canada, UK, the United States and Europe, will come to Bodhanath Stupa - KTM to live, study, practices and travel together in the whole of the Himalayan range, exploring a very different culture and lifestyle, and a very different perceptions of people and themselves. They will experience both the traditions and changes that make the Stupa of Bodhanath so distinctive and so important for being able to grasp and understand insights of the present things, and things to come, in a variety of ways enabling them to understand what they see.

Participants will choose from a wide variety of online courses, or bring a personal research theme, allowing them to gain an understanding of some of the key concepts, background and methodology of some of the controversial topics that are at the forefront of the changes sweeping through Nepal, Tibet, China and India. From the meeting of these prerequisite with their experiential, they will be in position to appreciate the deep traditions and history that underlie everything that happens in the Himalayan region and around.

Students and researchers will work with qualified NGOs experts, academic tutors of repute and the young local generation to undertake different field studies and investigate for themselves the key issues of their projects. Coaching, supervision and daily briefings, sometimes discussed in classes is an important aspect of the quality of experiential. Through extensive opportunities they will meet and talk with a wide range of people, from lamas, artists, businessmen, NGOs or HEIs officials, to ordinary shopkeepers, youth and workers, by visiting villages, urban homes, SMEs small enterprise workplaces, local NGOs, monasteries, temples, schools, they will compare what they learn in class with what they experience themselves. This combination of high-level academic instruction with project-based investigative learning, discussions and debates, and online broadband interaction with database online is what will make Cairn programme a unique opportunity, in a unique place.

Face to face language tutorials in Nepalese, Indi, Tibetan and/or Chinese are made available as options for those who seek the abilities which will allow them to share, understand, develop, or hone their skills in close contact with local people.

Demolition of the old and construction of the new are everywhere, including the effects of the ongoing Maoists insurgency. This is the time to register what Nepalese, Tibetan and Chinese people are feeling, living through and hoping for now. Students will forever be referring to this experience by saying, "When I studied there, this is what Nepal was like…."

The following PROJECT PROPOSAL is indicative of the potential options being already operational.




III- DRAFT- STATUTES



1-REMINDER

These five are: (i) the traditional PhD, (ii) PhD by publication, (iii) PhD with
integrated study, (iv) the practice-based PhD in Art, and Design and Performing
Arts and (v) Professional Doctorates.


(i) - The Traditional PhD
The ‘traditional’ PhD in Britain is an individual research enquiry culminating in a single
thesis of, typically 80-100,000 words for humanities and social science disciplines and
40-50,000 words for natural and physical science subjects. There is, I suspect, a general
understanding among this audience of the main structural features of this model, but I
would like to draw attention to two points about its apparent simplicity and uniformity.
First, the nature of the research reported in the final thesis can be very diverse.
Different disciplinary families have very different methodologies of enquiry. For example
much basic, theoretical science (certain forms of physics, mathematics, philosophy) will
depend on observation, calculation and reasoning, which can be very different from
the methodologies of laboratory science with the core emphasis on the replicable experiment.
In social sciences no case of generation and collection of field work data can ever be
exactly repeated; precise socio-economic historical conditions can never be reproduced and ,
even if they could, the fact that the object of the research (the human subjects) can
develop knowledge of the research process itself and thus transform their behaviour,
would render the idea of replicability of little value. Further, in the humanities, the core
research method is that of textual interpretation, followed by synthesis of the understandings
gained and subsequent explanations — always subject to the possibility of further revision.
This degree of diversity indicates why the search for a single common research definition
and methodology has much less value than the development of mutual understanding and
respect for the range of forms of intellectual enquiry which we need, and which doctoral
degrees should reflect.
Secondly, over the past two decades a debate has developed in Britain about the fundamental purpose of the traditional PhD. The main criterion for success as a PhD candidate remains
the making of an original contribution to knowledge. However increasingly since the early 1980s
the British Research Councils, the main funders of British PhD students, have demanded that
the PhD also provides a form of research training, equipping those who undertake it for a career
in academic, scientific or industrial research. While these two aims can be combined there is also a potential conflict between the demand to focus in depth on one specific topic and the requirement for a breadth of understanding of all the research methodologies which a
particular discipline or professional field requires.



(ii) - PhD by publication.
I will only touch on this briefly since it typically only serves a small number of candidates.
In this route an experienced researcher (from a university or elsewhere) may present for examination a collection of already published work of sufficient quantity, quality, coherence
and originality. This is typically accompanied by an overview introduction (of, perhaps, 5,000
words) and a conclusion which together contextualise and explain the scientific contribution
of the overall portfolio.
Examination will, as with the traditional PhD, include a viva voce with an internal and an
external examiner, since a key issue here is to establish (particularly in the case of jointly
published work) that the work is wholly that of the candidate.



(iii) - PhD with Integrated Study
In recent years a number of criticisms of the structure of the British PhD have developed
from potential sponsors of PhD students. Middle Eastern government agencies, in particular,
have indicated that the traditional PhD alone does not provide all they want from a PhD
programme. They have asked for more breadth and more specific preparation for future
careers.
This has led to a new model, which has evolved out of both recent developments within Britain
and a critical assessment of the strengths of the American system. This model contains a number of course work elements — including research methods; the broadening of subject knowledge to include cutting-edge thinking across all aspects of a discipline; general skills (of, for example, group work, presentation, knowledge of intellectual property rights issues); and the development of teaching skills.
These course work elements are assessed, and underpin and lead to a traditional PhD thesis;
the result, which is now about to be piloted by ten English Universities, including Brighton,
should produce a doctoral student with both the depth and breadth which is now required
by many international sponsors.



(iv) - Practice-based PhD in Art and Design
Because of developments in both the role of research and the status of art and design
education in universities, a practice-based PhD in art and design has developed in Great Britain.
This covers a range of professional and creative fields including, for example, sculpture, film,
graphic design, photography and product design.
This involves the presentation to examiners of both a particular work of art or a successful
example of design and a written thesis or portfolio of writing. This writing will include a
significant element of written reflection on the genesis, execution and impact of the work
including specifying either or both of:
- the contribution to new knowledge, new forms of perception, new application within the
work of art or design.
- the contribution to knowledge and to the development of the field of art and design
practice made by the reflection on the artistic or design process which has taken place.
It is important to emphasise here that a central principle of this route (as with all those
described here) is that research activity and outcomes are clearly articulated and communicated in a way which allows a genuine contribution to knowledge - knowledge here being regarded as the collective wisdom and skills of humanity in general



(v) - Professional Doctorates
There are already nearly 200 examples of professional doctorates within British universities.
Among the key defining features of these doctorates are:
- The titles are different from PhD — they refer to a particular profession: EdD (education),
DBA (business management) , DPharm (pharmacy) and DEng. (engineering).
- They are designed for experienced professionals who want to do a PhD part-time while
remaining at work.
- Their aim is to make an original contribution to professional knowledge and professional
practice.
- They are studied in the work-place on an actual problem occurring in the work place.
- They often involves action research. A problem is identified, possible solutions are devised,
those solutions are implemented, their effectiveness is monitored, modifications are made,
the revised solutions are implemented — and so on...
There is a significant taught component. This allows the development of a cohort identity,
the teaching of research methods, the provision of extended subject training, the sharing
of methodologies, collective debate on common issues, experiences and the exploration
of the relevance of each research topic to the specific profession involved.
This will normally culminate in a thesis or portfolio which is examined in a similar way to the
thesis of the traditional PhD, although at times the length may be shorter since the
taught component has already been extensively assessed.

The distinction between the aims of this professional doctorate and the PhD can be
summed up in one sentence - ‘The PhD aims to produce a professional researcher
while the professional doctorate aims to produce a researching professional.’ Of all
the routes described here the professional doctorate may ultimately have the most
to contribute to the ways in which mutual knowledge transfer can take place
between the university and the wider social and economic community.








2- FURTHER COMMENTS


Five brief points can be made by way of comments :

2.1 - First this description of a number of possible routes to a doctorate is not intended
to suggest that anything goes. All of these models can and must be rigorously quality
assured and contain thorough and stringent examination procedures.

2.2 - Secondly the maintenance of comparability of standards nationally and internationally
will depend on a thorough quality assurance system based on peer review. Collective
responsibility amongst universities should here balance institutional autonomy.

2.3 - Thirdly the staff who supervise students in any of these models (including that of
traditional PhD) need thorough staff development. Poor quality research supervision
can lead to some of the most damaging effects that any university lecturer can inflict
on a student.

2.4 - And finally the notion of the researching professional, able to question and continuously
improve his or her own practice must apply as much to university teachers themselves as
to engineers, school teachers, business managers and pharmacists. It would be an unhappy
irony indeed if we academics failed to practice what we preach and were not prepared to
transform ourselves to meet these new requirements and challenges.

2.5- As far as the intended ECTS/ECDL credits have been approached. the present document
wants TO REQUEST TO ALL INTENDED SUPERVISORS TO KINDLY RETURN ASAP TO RWL THEIR KIND ADVICE, COMMENTS, AMENDMENTS AND OBSERVATION. CAIRN foreseen  ECTS/ECDL degrees to be proposed from undergraduate level upto the PD are:


A- Postgraduate Diploma (duration 3 years) :
Compulsory Modules(*) / Postgraduate Diploma
Participants aiming to a Postgraduate Diploma (3 years duration) must
accumulate 180 credits in six compulsory modules (20 credits each),
chosen from their project specialization. In addition to the compulsory
modules, participants are expected to complete a dissertation (60 credits)
on a relevant topic. Credits include participation to Short Courses,
and eventually EU Summer/Winter Campus cross-cultural schemes.


B- - Postgraduate Certificate (duration 1 year) :
Compulsory Modules(*) / Postgraduate Certificate
For a PostgraduateCertificate (1 year) 60 credits only must be gained.
Postgraduate Certificate applicants will select three compulsory modules
(20 credits each), for a total of 60 credits of their choice.
Credits include participation to Intensive Seminars and Short Courses,
and eventually EU Summer/Winter Campus cross-cultural schemes..


C - Postgraduate Open Learning :
Part-time Adult Education / Undergraduate Short Study
These are Open Learning part-time Foundation Courses, either
focusing on Language, Marketing Online, HRD and/or on
ICT-/VLE System Management skills linked to CAIRN options.
Eligibility conditions are based on the participants academic
background and/or professional experience (NGOs/SMEs).

D- Optional Placement Module :
This module is accessible after completion of minimum a Certificate,
and focuses on a set of agreed tasks or an assignment for placement
with an I/NGO, donor organization or an ICT-/HRD specialized training
related NGO/SME in the EU. Credits may be gained this way.


E- Professional Doctorate (Thesis) :
See details hereunder.





3- CAIRN PROFESSIONAL THESIS BOARD SET-UP BACKGROUND :


When Academic Board Members, those who supervised CAIRN activities since 95, considered
the idea that CAIRN could provide, on basis of its established EU/UK ACADEMIC NETWORK expertise, selected opportunities for ASIAN and or EU/UK candidates to gain a new
qualification at a new academic level: the Professional Doctorate (PD) at Level D,
appeared to us as being the best avenue.
Professional Doctorate could make a significant contribution to the enhancement of
an occupational or professional area through the upgraded action research studies, new technology ICT/VLE application, development of pilot research work and testing of theoretical frameworks...





4- FORESEEN ACADEMIC BOARD MEMBERS (here listed as per country/discipline/availability
)

4.1- CAIRN EU-NGO Organization Management / Cultural Immersion Coordination CAIRN CEO:
>>
William R LEON CAIRN/SXC KTM NP



4.2- Thesis Formal Supervision Board (ECTS/ECDL)


ACTIVE MEMBERS (as per Statutes)

Fr. William B ROBINS SJ Director St-Xavier's College SXC/SXSSC KTM (SXC covers all sectors in NP)

Prof. Mike SINGLETON President UCL/POLS/ANSO/LAAP Belgium (Be/Anthropology/Philo/Ethno/AV)

Prof. Ian CLEGG ex- UWS/CDS Swansea U Wales UK (UK/Development Studies, Anthropo, Crisis/AV),

Howard M-J UWS/DACE Swansea U Wales/UK : e-Learning Mixed-Mode System Management (AV).


AVAILABLE MEMBERS (on request)


Prof. Brigitte PIQUARD (ex UCL/NOHA/EC HUMANITARIAN ASS TRAINING> Oxford/on standby)

Dr. Julie SWITAJ Psychology Consultancy Canada (on standby)

Dr. Marco PARET NLPIII/Hypnotherapy ISI-CNV ITaly (under discussion/NLPIII-Anthropo-Psy/AV)

Prof. R. P. GARTOULLA NIHS & TU/IOM (on stanby) (ethnomed, anthropo, PHC, paramedic, pol)



PRESSENTED:
Prof. Helene HINTJEN ex- UWS/CDS Swansea U Wales UK (idem> standby)

Prof. Antonio GUERCI Genova U Scarpa Ethnomedicine Unit Italy (on standby)

Prof. Robert STEICHEN UCL/PSP/ARAC Belgium (on standby)

(open...)

LOCAL FIELD-SUPERVISORS

for other Nepal field- supervision members, please go to : Consortium Webpage





5- STATUTES PROPOSED FRAMEWORK:
(CAIRN Framework for Professional Doctorates)



5.1. - Scope of the framework document


5.1.1 - This framework defines the concept and principles of CAIRN Consortium EU/UK/NP
Academic Collaboration Professional Doctorate (PD) award.
It outlines the baseline requirements for the design of individual awards and defines the
processes that each programme team must go through to get their awards approved.
5.1.2 - Units, Sub-units, Colleges or Faculties wishing to work with CAIRN NP to offer
one or more PDs should use this framework to underpin the design and delivery of their
specific SUPERVISING EXPERTISE and related disciplines or programmes. Specific and
exceptional features of any PD programme answering NP current priorities are described
hereunder within; in general the processes for approval, operation and quality assurance
of PDs will follow normal procedures for modular courses.
5.1.3 - The Framework has been developed by a working group of the SXC, UWS and UCL,
during 2001/2005. This Working group can be addressed directly, if needed be.


5.2. - Rationale

5.2.1 - The definition of the qualification will be as follows:
‘The Professional Doctorate is an untitled award at Level D reserved for programmes
where researchers, students or professional applicants have made a significant contribution
to the enhancement of an occupational or professional area through the application,
development and testing of theoretical frameworks’. This definition of Professional
Doctorates is to be included in the revised MoU and collaborative units regulations.

5.2.2 - Sometimes referred to as the ‘taught’ or ‘modular’ doctorate, PDs are intended
as an alternative to PhDs for expat- field researchers and/or staff in organisations wishing
to research their professional practice at the doctorate level but not wishing to pursue
the pure research route required by the conventional PhD, which complex field expertise
sometimes cannot be met by the established EU/UK academe, per se.
PDs will be situated very much within professional practice, and students will be
required to show evidence that, through their studies and by applying and testing
existing and new theories, they have made a significant contribution to improvements
or changes in their organisation or working practices which can be applied elsewhere.

5.2.3 - PDs are a growing presence in UK HE provision. A survey conducted on behalf
of the UK Council for Graduate Education has revealed that since the 1990s there has
been a rapid growth in the number of such awards. In 2000 70% of UK universities were
offering at least one award of this type, in areas such as teacher education, medicine,
clinical psychology, business administration, engineering and educational psychology.
These Doctoral Qualifications are in direct relation to Professional Careers.

5.2.4 - Whilst it would appear that the majority of PDs are awarded by pre-1992 universities,
the vocational nature of such provision at the undergraduate and postgraduate level places is
an ideal position to develop such occupationally related awards. Limited market research carried out by in UK has revealed the most likely areas to develop PDs will be for the health professions including occupational psychology, counselling and biomedical sciences, business studies and education. This, of course, does not preclude other subject areas from developing PDs.

5.2.5 - Common to other forms of work-based or work-related learning, these awards will be
defined by a partnership of the CAIRN NETWORK OF ESTABLISHED RESOURCE-PEOPLE selected in recognized EU/UK and Asian HEIs, INGOs, colleges or universities. Each partner will benefit in different ways. PDs will enable us to develop CAIRN NP niches and specificities, as well as contribute to research in new areas and to collaborate further with employers; in so
doing we shall be engaging in an exchange of knowledge and practice at the highest level.
This transfer of knowledge will be used to enhance curriculum at undergraduate and
postgraduate levels, and help meeting the identified needs of the diverse community
which we seek to serve.

The benefits to students will be in terms of formal recognition and accreditation of
their professional development; and a raised profile within their profession both within,
and perhaps beyond, their organisation as a result of the outcomes of successful project work.
Their activities can also be expected to enhance their personal and professional capabilities
for the future.

In turn employers will have the benefit of being involved in the project planning process
and the implementation of project outcomes within their organisations, together with
the opportunity to collaborate with leading academics. A survey of employers with
experience of PDs undertaken on behalf of the UK Council for Graduate Education
concluded that he benefits perceived by employers included:
• the development of individual skills, particularly in the area of research;
• the development of organisational skills, by dissemination from the individual students
together with involvement in the programme;
• retention and motivation of staff;
• improved skills in management and leadership;
• improved quality of output/product of the organisation.

The projects undertaken for the PD must address a stated workplace or professional
needs / objectives. The outcomes of the learning must be recognisable by other
organisations in the same sector or other professionals. Additionally, the evidence of
D-level project learning must show the impact it has had, or could have, on the
occupational / professional area.

The outcomes of the PD study must represent a significant new contribution to a
body of applied knowledge or practice; specifically, students must demonstrate innovation
in the application of knowledge to a stated occupational or professional area.

In addition PD candidates must demonstrate the following competencies:
• expert knowledge of the appropriate subject area;
• the appreciation of the occupational or professional area and its development
culture;
• project and programme management skills;
• teamwork skills and, where appropriate, leadership skills;
• oral and written communication skills;
organisational skills;
• the ability to apply their skills to new situations;
• the ability to seek optimal, viable solutions to multi-faceted organisational,
occupational or professional problems and to search out relevant information sources.

The PD awards will be appropriate for employees at various stages of their career;
some will be designed to match the needs of younger professionals who have not
been in employment for very long, others will be designed for those with more experience.
PD awards may be designed for specific groups within a certain occupation or profession.

Each PD award will be named in such a way as to link it to a subject area.
PD awards are untitled, i.e. they have no specific titles qualifying the award name.




6- PROF- THESIS (PD) PROJECT DESIGN & CONSTRUCTION (PLAN):

6.1 - The general nature and design of specific PD programmes will be subject to the normal
validation and periodic appraisal processes. Where appropriate, it may be possible to
consider more than one PD proposal at the same validation event to simplify the process for
the development of individual PDs.

6.2 - Each PD will be defined within a programme specification. In certain cases these
descriptors will be determined by the existence of a professional body with an interest in
influencing the parameters of such an award. In perhaps the majority of cases the PD
programme team will need to define the programme specification attributes, these serving as
the ‘curricular headlines’ for all learners undertaking that award.

6.3 - The PD consists of two major elements, the POSTGRADUATE CREDITS: ECTS/ECDL,
Masters Phase and the Doctoral Phase.

6.4 - All elements of the Doctoral Phase, including the investigative projects within Stage 2 of this
phase, will be constructed as modules with a specific credit volume at Level D. The normal
expectation is that two or three project modules will be undertaken during Stage 2, the
permitted number depending upon the curricular context.

6.5 - Within the Doctoral Phase of each PD there are several possible models for achieving the
objectives of the programme specification:

(a) In one model there is a pre-determined content in terms of modules designed and
approved by members of the programme team, although there may be some optional
choice from a prescribed list. The project stage will contain learning that is specific to a
student working in a specific occupational or professional environment, and will inevitably
require negotiation with the tutor.

(b) In another model, the specific curricular methodology is entirely negotiated by the
candidate working in partnership with the University tutor and the employer (using the
principles within the Learning at Work Framework). Thus in this model two learners on
the same PD award might negotiate an entirely different modular structure for achieving
the same objectives.

(c) A model consisting of a hybrid of types (a) and (b).


6.6 - The nature of the Doctoral Phase of PDs, with strong links to the workplace and emphasis on
project work, make it necessary to use a mechanism that will record the individual programme
of study for each student. This mechanism is the learning agreement, through which the
learner and her/his tutor will record the nature of learning within each module, its learning
outcomes, its assessment methodology and a timescale within which the learning is expected
to be demonstrated. The learning agreement is devised and approved as part of the Planning
Module in Stage 1 of the Doctoral Phase.

Learning agreements require individual formal approval but may be changed
throughout the period in which the Doctoral Phase is being undertaken, provided the change is
formally agreed.




7- ENTRY REQUIREMENTS:

The PD requires the completion of (................) ? credits at appropriate levels (ECTS/ECDL).
However, there are two entry routes to the PD; for these purposes they can be called
‘Graduate entry’ and ‘Masters entry’:


7.1 - Graduate entry – candidates will hold a first degree, honours or equivalent and appropriate
experience. For these candidates, who need to complete the full ...............? credits, Faculties /
Schools may wish to consider validating appropriate taught Masters routes, perhaps according
to principles within the Learning at Work framework in terms of allowing a combination of
taught and work-based learning, which will enable progression to the doctoral stage.

Completion of the MRes would also be an excellent starting point for students wishing to
proceed on to Level D.

The Masters will incorporate the relevant research methodologies required for the Masters
thesis, but not necessarily for Level D study. Normally, Graduate entry candidates will register
initially for the Level M exit qualification. Admission to the doctoral stage will be dependent
upon the achievement of an appropriate Masters qualification.


7.2 - Masters entry – candidates already possess a cognate Level M qualification, such as MSc,
MA
, MRes or MPhil. By cognate, it is meant that the Masters curriculum is relevant to and
underpins the planned doctoral study, although further D-level learning about investigative
methodologies may still be required. The Level M qualification must also have contained a
significant research element. PD validation documents should specify a list of appropriate
Masters titles.

Candidates entering at this stage will need to complete ..................??? credits at Level D,
but there may be occasions where further Level M learning is required to underpin the
Doctoral Phase, for example where the Masters learning did not contain a significant research
element.



7.3 - EC regulations state that up to 75% of a postgraduate award may be achieved through the
accreditation of prior learning, provided that evidence of that learning is recent, reliable and
relevant. While wishing to facilitate credit transfer from learning achieved at other institutions,
the following specific regulations will apply to this process with PDs:

(a) For candidates starting their PD with Graduate entry, both prior learning that is
certificated (APL) and prior learning that is experiential (APEL) may be claimed, according
to standard UMF regulations. The details are that up to two-thirds of the credit for a
Masters may be claimed from APL and up to one-half may be claimed from APEL.

(b) For candidates entering the PD programme with Masters entry, up to the whole of the
Masters award can be counted as certificated prior learning for the PD, provided the
learning was appropriate to the objectives of the Doctoral Phase. Credit from
prior experiential learning may not contribute towards the Doctoral Phase of the PD.
In addition, up to ..........? credits from certificated prior learning at D-level can be counted
towards the learning within Stage 1 (usually from supervised prior learning in investigative
techniques).

Exceptionally, learning achieved under supervision elsewhere may be transferred into the
projects within Stage 2 of the Doctoral Phase of the JMU PD and the outcomes of such
prior learning presented as part of the evidence for assessment.

The amount of such ‘learning transfer’ is at the discretion of the Faculty Programme Approval grouping, and must not be of such volume as to mask the focus on achieving D-level learning
at JMU. Credit from any type of prior learning cannot contribute towards Stage 3 of the
Doctoral Phase of the PD.




8. PROGRAMME MANAGEMENT:


8.1 - It is for Faculties to decide whether a specific CAIRN affiliated PD will be operated at
either the Unit, Faculty or School level. The choice will usually be made as part of the local
strategy for postgraduate provision. Where a Faculty decides to operate a Faculty-wide
post-graduate programme it may decide to incorporate the PD within this structure.

Other Faculties with a more diverse mix of academic areas may decide to operate
postgraduate programmes at the School level; in this situation it is more likely that
the PD will be owned by a specific School.


8.2 - Approval of the award name, abbreviation (e.g. EdD) and description should be gained from
the Awards sub-group of the Programme Logistics Panel.


8.3 - Validation of the PD programme will be undertaken via the usual processes. Such a validation
will consider:
• the PD programme specification.
the curricular design in relationship to the programme specification.
the requirements for Graduate Entry and Masters Entry.
the membership, terms of reference and modus operandi of the group that will
approve individual learning agreements.
the methods of delivery.
the experience of programme team staff.
the roles and responsibilities of all internal and external staff involved in supporting and
supervising PD students
• the system in place for the support of work based mentors
• the general assessment strategy for the PD stages.
the general arrangements for the External Examiner(s) involvement in the Doctoral phase
of the PD.

Approval of the programmes of study to be undertaken by individual PD students will be a
separate process.



8.4 - Each PD student will belong to a Home School, which provides general academic and
administrative support for the whole award. Where a module is taken in another School, it is
the responsibility of the supplying School to ensure that the learner is appropriately supported
during the study of that module.


8.5 - When learning is undertaken in the work place, the students will have a work-based mentor
who has been provided with appropriate support by the University. Support for mentors will be
provided by JMU staff with appropriate experience of D-level learning.


8.6 - Proposals for a PD should emphasise the importance of communication between tutors and
the work-based PD student and, where appropriate, between different PD students. Details
should be provided about how ICT systems (such as Blackboard) will be used to facilitate such
communication. (REF HMJ)

8.7 - The individualised nature of learning within the Doctoral Phase and, where appropriate the
Masters Phase, of PDs makes it imperative that each learning agreement is formally assessed
by experienced peers and, through them, approved by the University. In this way the learning
objectives, learning methodology, project supervision arrangements, assessment requirements
and timescales for each individualised module will be subject to specific validation.
PD Programme Approval will be granted by the CAIRN existing SUPERVISION BOARD.
Details of the membership of such a team, its terms of reference, and its modus operandi
must be included in the validation documentation for each PD.


8.8 - The Faculty PD Programme Approval grouping must, at least for an initial
period, include membership of at least one colleague from another Faculty, who is experienced
in doctoral level learning/research. Approval of the JMU Graduate School Board will be
required for the appointment of these ‘external’ members. Faculties who have operated this
system for at least three years may, if they wish, seek to remove the requirements for external
Faculty membership through the appropriate quality assurance process within the Faculty.





9- ASSESSMENT:

9.1 - Assessment will follow the regulations and practices of the affiliated EU / UK Universities
Modular Framework, under the project Head Supervisor, subject to the points below.

9.2 - The arrangements for assessment of the Masters element of the PD will be as determined
within the specific documentation for each specific Masters award.
The D-Level Elements of the PD: the Doctoral Phase


9.3 - One External Examiner (EE) will be appointed for the Doctoral Phase of each PD programme
to act as the Programme EE. Such Programme EEs must have experience that is relevant to
the PD subject discipline and to PD level work, and have empathy with the aspirations of the
PD qualification. The Programme EE will be associated with the module(s) in Stage 1 and the
Reflective Module in Stage 3, together with any project modules in Stage 2 where s/he has
appropriate subject experience. Additional EEs will be appointed to modules within Stage 2 of
the Doctoral Phase if the subject matter being presented for assessment falls outside the
subject range covered by the Programme EE.


9.4 - The appointment of External Examiners will be carried out within the usual procedures for the
appointment of EEs to modular programmes. In addition to the standard procedures, the
process must involve consultation with the Director of the Graduate School, acting on behalf
of the Graduate School Board, about the appropriateness of the EE proposals.
It is recognised that clear criteria must be developed and agreed for the appointment of
External Examiners operating at Level D within the UMF.


9.5 - For modules within each of the D-level stages of the PD, the nature of materials acceptable for
assessment, and any minimum textual requirements, must be specified in outline terms within
the validation documentation for that PD and in detail within the learning agreements
approved by the PD Programme Approval group.


9.6 - The assessment requirements of specific modules within the Doctoral Phase are as follows:

9.6.1 - Stage 1:
The …………? 30-? credit Planning Module will be assessed via a short report (no more than 2500 words are suggested) which seeks to justify the rationale for the project activities planned within
Stage 2 of the Doctoral Phase, indicates how each project is to be undertaken, describes the
significant milestones to be achieved and includes the completed learning agreement for the
whole Doctoral Phase. Other taught or negotiated modules in this introductory stage will be
assessed in a methodology summarised in the learning agreement.


9.6.2 - Stage 2:
The investigative project modules will each be assessed via a methodology described in the
learning agreement. Where appropriate, candidates may submit evidence of learning beyond
the normal textual form along with a project report. The report on each project must include
an executive summary that is of publishable quality in professional/academic journals, using
professional criteria determined by the programme team.


9.6.3 Stage 3:
The ……………? 60-? credit Reflective Module will be assessed via a portfolio of evidence that contains all the project reports from Stage 2, together with a concise report (less than 10,000 words are suggested), which seeks to synthesise the outcomes of the various investigative projects,
reflect on the integrative value of the whole endeavour and looks forward to how the learning
achieved can be developed further / applied in the professional context.

The Programme EE will conduct a viva voce examination of all PD candidates for the
Reflective Module, in partnership with an internal assessor for that module. The award of a
Professional Doctorate will depend upon a satisfactory outcome from this examination,
together with pass grades in all other modular elements within the PD.


9.7 - All modular assessments within the PD must be subject to an unsighted double marking
procedure for internal assessors.


9.8 - Assessment of modules where all or much of the learning is carried out in the workplace may
involve input from a workplace assessor who will not normally be the workplace mentor.
Appropriate support must be provided for such workplace assessors. Details of arrangements
for the assessment of work-based learning must be provided within the PD
validation documents.

9.9 - Each module result within the PD will be moderated via the appropriate Module Assessment
Board. Normally, module results at Doctoral level will be graded as either Pass or Fail. The
standard UMF regulations concerning referral after failure of a D-level module will apply,
namely that “students will be given a single opportunity of referral in failed modules….”.


9.10 - The UMF compensation regulations will not apply to any modules undertaken during the
Doctoral Phase of the PD programme.


9.11 - Decisions about making a PD award will be the responsibility of the Programme Assessment
Board for the PD. A Professional Doctorate will be awarded to candidates who have achieved
.............? credits at Level M and .................? credits at Level D from an approved
programme of study.

PD awards will not be classified; that is, there will not be a Distinction grade awarded.






10- PROJECT VALIDATION:

Project validation for a Professional Doctorate may follow the stages listed here as follows:

1. Idea emerges from academic area within CAIRN (policy) and/or comes from Applicants.
2. CAIRN incorporates schedule for developing a PD and seeks appropriate -level approval.
3. Faculty approval. Proposal sent back to the Initiator, if not approved.
4. Creation of Supervision team for PD.
• appoint PD leader
• identify staff with the potential to supervise PD students.
5. Development of initial concepts.
Including:
programme aims and outcomes
• general structure, including entry requirements
• undertaking market research
• assessing potential student numbers and their constituency
• surveying similar offerings by local competitors
• budgeting
• assessing the human and material resources required
6. Submit to New PD for approval all Members concerned.
Details of the process, meeting dates and forms to be completed. New PD proposal will be subjected to compatible Supervision standard agreed with of new Applicant(s).
7. Approval of the award name and abbreviation by CAIRN sub-group.

8. Full development of PD documentation.
Special consideration would need to be given to:
• the PD programme specification.
the curricular design in relationship to the programme specification.
the requirements for Graduate Entry and Masters Entry.
the membership, terms of reference and modus operandi of the group that will
approve individual learning agreements (Pedagogic Contract).
the methods of delivery.
the experience of programme team staff.
the roles and responsibilities of all internal and external staff involved in supporting and
supervising PD students
• the system in place for the support and training of work based mentors
• the general assessment strategy for the PD stages.
the general arrangements for External Examiner involvement.

9. Final Board Approval.
Normal procedures for university validation will apply; proposals may be deferred for
further development in which case programme teams will need to return to stage 8; once
full approval is given the programme may proceed to stages 10 and 11.

10. Start Pre-Delivery Preparation
Arrangements would need to be made for:
• development of student handbook
• development of appropriate learning resources and support mechanisms
• creation of PD programmes approval board
• staff development re: PD supervision, work based mentoring/supervision
11. Start Delivery




END /DOC


Appendices
Appendix A – Professional Doctorate Working Group membership
Appendix B – QAA Qualification Descriptors
Appendix C – National Credit Guideline Level Descriptors
Appendix D - Draft Assessment Criteria for D-Level Modules



Appendix A
Membership of the Professional Doctorates Working Group

(in process...)


Appendix B
QAA Qualification Descriptors
Taken from The framework for higher education qualifications in England, Wales and Northern
Ireland January 2001 produced by the Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education
QAA Descriptor for qualifications at Doctoral (D) level:
Doctoral degree
Doctorates are awarded to students who have demonstrated:
I. the creation and interpretation of new knowledge, through original research or other
advanced scholarship, of a quality to satisfy peer review, extend the forefront of the
discipline, and merit publication;
II. a systematic acquisition and understanding of a substantial body of knowledge which is at
the forefront of an academic discipline or area of professional practice;
III. the general ability to conceptualise, design and implement a project for the generation of
new knowledge, applications or understanding at the forefront of the discipline, and to
adjust the project design in the light of unforeseen problems;
IV. a detailed understanding of applicable techniques for research and advanced academic
enquiry.
Typically, holders of the qualification will be able to:
a) make informed judgements on complex issues in specialist fields, often in the absence of
complete data, and be able to communicate their ideas and conclusions clearly and
effectively to specialist and non-specialist audiences;
b) continue to undertake pure and/or applied research and development at an advanced level,
contributing substantially to the development of new techniques, ideas, or approaches;
and will have:
c) the qualities and transferable skills necessary for employment requiring the exercise of
personal responsibility and largely autonomous initiative in complex and unpredictable
situations, in professional or equivalent environments


Appendix C
Level Descriptors for Levels M and D
Taken from The NICATS Generic Level Descriptors accessed in March 2002 from
http://www.nicats.ac.uk/about/prn_tlevl_descriptors.pdf and forming part of the National Credit
Guidelines for England, Wales and Northern Ireland.
Level M. Learning accredited at this level will reflect the ability to:
display mastery of a complex and specialised area of knowledge and skills, employing advanced
skills to conduct research, or advanced technical or professional activity, accepting accountability
for related decision-making including use of supervision Level Intellectual skills & attributes Processes Accountability M

• Display mastery of a complex and specialized area of knowledge and skills
• Demonstrate expertise in highly specialised and advanced technical, professional and/or
research skills

• Conduct research, or advanced technical or professional activity
• Design and apply appropriate research methodologies
• Communicate results of research to peers
• Accept accountability in related decision making including use of supervision



Level M:

Guidelines for Interpretation
Intellectual skills and attributes
Knowledge: Display mastery of a complex and specialised area of knowledge and skills
Skills: Demonstrate expertise in highly specialised and advanced technical, professional
and/or research skills
The most significant characteristic is the exploration of boundaries where preceding levels
focused on knowledge and skills within them.
Processes
Process: Conduct research, or advanced technical or professional activity.
Role and Function: Design and apply appropriate research methodologies. Communicate
results of research to peers.
Highly complex tasks and procedures are featured at this level
Accountability
Autonomy: Accept accountability in related decision making including use of supervision
Accountability is usually to peers rather than to superiors. The learner is responsible for
initiating supervisory and peer support contacts.



Level D:

Learning accredited at this level will reflect the ability to:
make a significant and original contribution to a specialised field of inquiry demonstrating a
command of methodological issues and engaging in critical dialogue with peers; accepting full
accountability for outcomes Level Intellectual skills & attributes

Processes Accountability D

• Make a significant and original contribution to a specialised field of inquiry
• Command highly specialised and advanced technical, professional and/or research skills
• Demonstrate command of methodological issues
• Communicate results of research to peers and engage in critical dialogue
• Accept accountability in related decision making including use of supervision

Level D:

Guidelines for interpretation
Intellectual skills and attributes
Knowledge: Make a significant and original contribution to a specialised field of enquiry
Skills: Command highly specialised and advanced technical, professional and/or research
skills
Make a significant and original contribution – the essential difference between level M and
level D is the satisfaction of both of these requirements.
Processes
Process: Demonstrate command of methodological issues
Role and Function: Communicate results of research to peers and engage in critical
dialogue
Learners will have command and confidence in the application of discipline-related research
methods and in the discussion of methodological issues
Accountability
Autonomy: Accept accountability in related decision making including use of supervision.


Appendix D
Draft Assessment Criteria for D-Level Modules7
The purpose of assessment criteria is to establish clear and unambiguous standards of
achievement in respect of each learning outcome (Credit and HE Qualifications Guidelines).
D-level credit can be awarded when the learner has demonstrated the ability to:
(a) create and interpret new knowledge which is at the forefront of an academic discipline or an
area of professional practice;
(b) propose, discuss, evaluate and defend such knowledge and scholarship with peers;
(c) conceptualise, design and implement a project for the generation of new knowledge or
applications;
(d) apply and develop appropriate techniques and methodologies applicable to research and
advanced scholarship;
(e) work independently dealing with complex and unpredictable situations in professional or
equivalent environments.

EXAMPLE OF EXISTING PD/UK:

 >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
Psychology : Research Degree in Professional Doctorate in Health Psychology
PhD : F/T - 24 months
Description: The Supervised Practice Programme will allow eligible candidates to become Chartered Health Psychologists (as recognised by the BPS).

Although developed as part of a national initiative, this new and innovative "pathway" utilises the established research expertise and teaching excellence in the field of Health Psychology at the University, and draws on its close relationships with local healthcare providers.

The Supervised Practice Programme will allow students to work in a Health Psychology context in a clinical and/or academic environment under the regular supervision of Chartered Health Psychologists based at the University.
Contact: David Stewart
Telephone: 01582 489106
Email: david.stewart@luton.ac.uk
Qualification Information: Assessment: Coursework, portfolio and dissertation.
Entry Requirements: A good first degree in psychology which is eligible for the graduate basis for registration with the British Psychological Society (BPS), and an MSc in Health Psychology (accredited by the BPS).
Fees: UK/EU £2897 per year.
Overseas £8034 per year.
Funds: Every year the University of Luton awards a large number of scholarships to students from all over the world. There are several different types of scholarship award on offer, each aiming to assist students with their fees and / or living expenses while they are studying. The exact amount can vary, although the average sum awarded is around £500.

While many are supported directly by the University, there are a number which are funded by leading local and national companies, helping to establish a valuable contact between students and potential future employers.
Students eligible for scholarships can fall into two categories:

1. The International Students’ Scholarship Scheme (for non-EU students)
2. The Companies’ Scholarship Scheme (for UK/EU students)
International Information: A pre-masters foundation programme is offered to students who need to improve their english language skills or academic level before progressing to a Masters degree programme.
Website: http://www.luton.ac.uk/courses/bysubject/psy/dhealthpsy-prodocheapsy
Keywords/Speciality Areas of study on this course include:

* Professional
* Research
* Consultancy
* Teaching/training


Psychology : Research Degree in Professional Doctorate in Health Psychology
PhD : F/T - 24 months
Description: The Supervised Practice Programme will allow eligible candidates to become Chartered Health Psychologists (as recognised by the BPS).

Although developed as part of a national initiative, this new and innovative "pathway" utilises the established research expertise and teaching excellence in the field of Health Psychology at the University, and draws on its close relationships with local healthcare providers.


Entry Requirements: A good first degree in psychology which is eligible for the graduate basis for registration with the British Psychological Society (BPS), and an MSc in Health Psychology (accredited by the BPS).


Fees: UK/EU £2897 per year.
Overseas £8034 per year.


Funds: exact amount can vary, although the average sum awarded is around £500.

While many are supported directly by the University, there are a number which are funded by leading local and national companies, helping to establish a valuable contact between students and potential future employers.


Students eligible for scholarships can fall into two categories:

1. The International Students’ Scholarship Scheme (for non-EU students)
2. The Companies’ Scholarship Scheme (for UK/EU students)
International Information: A pre-masters foundation programme is offered to students who need to improve their english language skills or academic level before progressing to a Masters degree programme.


Keywords/Speciality Areas of study on this course include:

* Professional
* Research
* Consultancy
* Teaching/training

 



Frequently asked questions
>
>The list of Frequently Asked Questions aims to answer any queries
>you may have relating to the programme, fees, application process, APL and
>supervision and work based learning.
>

The programme
>
>Q. I am very interested in completing a distance-based,
>internationally experienced doctorate with travel to the university
>if/when necessary. Is it possible to complete the program from
>outside the UK?
>
>A.For all students, there will be 2 research conferences per year,
>which are face to face and held at the……….. The
>conferences will be the only face to face components of the course
>until the thesis defence at the end of Phase Three. Therefore the
>maximum attendance commitment in any year will be 2 face to face
>events. These events are likely to take place over 1-2 days. In the
>first year of the course there will also be a compulsory induction
>event.
>
>The rest of the learning will be through the Virtual Learning
>Environment and individual support/correspondence. If you are an
>overseas student and happen to be in the UK at any one time, you
>might find it helpful to get in touch with your supervisory team.
>
>Q. Are the research conferences residential or can they be attended
>on a daily basis?
>
>A. The research conferences will be face to face, but do not need to
>be residential. If it is easy for you to attend on a daily basis
>then that is perfectly fine. There will be 2 such events in a year,
>so hopefully this will fit in with busy schedules. Each event is
>likely to take place over 1-2 days.
>>
>Q. How long does the program normally take to complete? Can
>determined students who have a focused research interest complete
>the programme within 3 years?
>
>A. The minimum period of study for ‘full time' participants is 2
>years, ‘part time' students is 3 years – however this is the minimum
>period and would require a substantial commitment by the student. It
>is possible to aim for the minimum part time period of 3 years, and
>if things take a little longer that is ok.
>
>Q. How long does each Phase take to complete?
>
>A. As a guideline, Phase One and Phase Two each take a year to
>complete, and Phase Three and Four involve the research activity and
>writing up, taking a minimun of one year. We understand that life
>and work can intervene from time to time, so there is some
>flexibility for participants.
>
>Q. Is it possible to have further details about the content of each
>phase of study?
>
>A. Outline details are available from the PDF document and further
>details are also available in the Programme Specification (word
>document).
>
>Q. What is the type of assessment required to pass each unit/module?
>
>A. Normally, there will be a written assignment at the end of each
>unit. Phase Three will be assessed by submission of a thesis and a
>Viva Voce examination.
>The fees
>
>Q. Can you give me some indication of cost so I can decide whether
>to approach work or self fund?
>
>Q. I would be sponsored by the company I am employed by, and am
>curious to know tuition costs.
>
>A. An instalment plan and a modular plan have been devised for
>flexibility and to enable participants' to spread the cost of the
>fees. This refers to the cost for the September 2005 cohort.
>
>
>
>

 

Payment by instalments
>
>
>Payment by modular basis
>Phase One £3000 4 x £540 plus £1080
>Phase Two £3000 3 x £1080
>Phase Three* 2 x £2100 2 x £2100
>Total £10,200 £10,680
>

The outcomes of the PD study must represent a significant new contribution to a body of
applied knowledge or practice; specifically, students must demonstrate innovation in the
application of knowledge to a stated occupational or professional area.
In addition PD candidates must demonstrate the following competencies:
• expert knowledge of the appropriate subject area;
• the appreciation of the occupational or professional area and its development
culture;
• project and programme management skills;
• teamwork skills and, where appropriate, leadership skills;
• oral and written communication skills;
organisational skills;
• the ability to apply their skills to new situations;
• the ability to seek optimal, viable solutions to multi-faceted organisational, occupational or
professional problems and to search out relevant information sources

.
The PD awards will be appropriate for employees at various stages of their career; some will
be designed to match the needs of younger professionals who have not been in employment
for very long, others will be designed for those with more experience. PD awards may be
designed for specific groups within a certain occupation or profession.


It is envisaged that, in the main, these awards will be managed by each Faculty / School.
Faculty / School MABs and PABs will operate according to standard UMF practices, dealing
with the moderation of all modules and advised by the appropriate External Examiner(s).

Each PD award will be named in such a way as to link it to a subject area.

PDs will be modular in structure and follow the conventions laid out in the Credit and HE
Each PD will be defined within a programme specification. In certain cases these
descriptors will be determined by the existence of a professional body with an interest in
influencing the parameters of such an award. In perhaps the majority of cases the PD
programme team will need to define the programme specification attributes, these serving as
the ‘curricular headlines’ for all learners undertaking that award.

The PD consists of two major elements, the Masters Phase and the Doctoral Phase.
All elements of the Doctoral Phase, including the investigative projects within Stage 2 of this
phase, will be constructed as modules with a specific credit volume at Level D. The normal
expectation is that two or three project modules will be undertaken during Stage 2, the
permitted number depending upon the curricular context.


Within the Doctoral Phase of each PD there are several possible models for achieving the
objectives of the programme specification:
(a) In one model there is a pre-determined content in terms of modules designed and
approved by members of the programme team, although there may be some optional
choice from a prescribed list. The project stage will contain learning that is specific to a
student working in a specific occupational or professional environment, and will inevitably
require negotiation with the tutor.
(b) In another model, the specific curricular methodology is entirely negotiated by the
candidate working in partnership with the University tutor and the employer (using the
principles within the Learning at Work Framework). Thus in this model two learners on
the same PD award might negotiate an entirely different modular structure for achieving
the same objectives.
(c) A model consisting of a hybrid of types (a) and (b).

Entry Requirements
The PD requires the completion of 540 credits at appropriate levels.
However, there are two entry routes to the PD; for these purposes they can be called
‘Graduate entry’ and ‘Masters entry’:

1 Graduate entry – candidates will hold a first degree, honours or equivalent and appropriate
experience. For these candidates, who need to complete the full 540 credits, Faculties /
Schools may wish to consider validating appropriate taught Masters routes, perhaps according
to principles within the Learning at Work framework in terms of allowing a combination of
taught and work-based learning, which will enable progression to the doctoral stage.
Completion of the MRes would also be an excellent starting point for students wishing to
proceed on to Level D.
The Masters will incorporate the relevant research methodologies required for the Masters
thesis, but not necessarily for Level D study. Normally, Graduate entry candidates will register
initially for the Level M exit qualification. Admission to the doctoral stage will be dependent
upon the achievement of an appropriate Masters qualification.

2 Masters entry – candidates already possess a cognate Level M qualification, such as MSc,
MA
, MRes or MPhil. By cognate, it is meant that the Masters curriculum is relevant to and
underpins the planned doctoral study, although further D-level learning about investigative
methodologies may still be required. The Level M qualification must also have contained a
significant research element. PD validation documents should specify a list of appropriate
Masters titles. Candidates entering at this stage will need to complete 360 credits at Level D,
but there may be occasions where further Level M learning is required to underpin the
Doctoral Phase, for example where the Masters learning did not contain a significant research
element.

3 UMF regulations state that up to 75% of a postgraduate award may be achieved through the
accreditation of prior learning, provided that evidence of that learning is recent, reliable and
relevant. While wishing to facilitate credit transfer from learning achieved at other institutions,
the following specific regulations will apply to this process with PDs:
(a) For candidates starting their PD with Graduate entry, both prior learning that is
certificated (APL) and prior learning that is experiential (APEL) may be claimed, according
to standard UMF regulations. The details are that up to two-thirds of the credit for a
Masters may be claimed from APL and up to one-half may be claimed from APEL.
(b) For candidates entering the PD programme with Masters entry, up to the whole of the
Masters award can be counted as certificated prior learning for the PD, provided the
learning was appropriate to the objectives of the Doctoral Phase. Credit from
prior experiential learning may not contribute towards the Doctoral Phase of the PD.
In addition, up to 30 credits from certificated prior learning at D-level can be counted
towards the learning within Stage 1 (usually from supervised prior learning in investigative
techniques).

Exceptionally, learning achieved under supervision elsewhere may be transferred into the
projects within Stage 2 of the Doctoral Phase of the JMU PD and the outcomes of such
prior learning presented as part of the evidence for assessment. The amount of such
‘learning transfer’ is at the discretion of the Faculty Programme Approval grouping, and must not be of such volume as to mask the focus on achieving D-level learning
at JMU. Credit from any type of prior learning cannot contribute towards Stage 3 of the
Doctoral Phase of the PD

END/FULL/DOC/KTM18OCT2005 (RWL)

 

 

SAMPLE MoU :  reference to the previous MoU with UKPS Nonprofit in London

MoU Contract for the set-up of the Cairn Consortium at UKPS (LON)
MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING (MOU)


Dr. David Moiso , Bruno Bocchio (PhD),  and Mr Jonothon Boulter, acting directors (see UKPS organization roles) of the UKPS (Non-Profit Org), based in London, at :                         , acting on behalf of the UKPS Board of the one part,  and
R  William  LEON (PhD),  CAIRN Consortium CEO,  of the other part, 

have agreed as follows:


Article 1 - Subject
The subject of this MoU Contract is to undertake, at the date of signature, the set-up and upgraded organization of the Cairn Consortium / European Postgraduate and Doctorate School Research & Curriculum Development (R&D) Unit, to be based as a Branch of CAIRN in London UK-, under the condition for eligibility of Professional Doctorate (PD) and Postgraduate ECTS/ECDL high- education credits, as well as EC- related Asia-Link, Erasmus Mundus (Asia) and NOHA projects, regarding the administrative and operational conditions required for EU academic exchange joint-certification and supervision. These modalities include the prior-conditions required for maintenance of the ICT-/VLE multimedia database and required online learning technical requirements for networking with other EU and Asian HEI units related to the CAIRN project postgraduate curricula and research thesis development .


Article 2 - Modalities
The following modalities are an integral part of the present Memorandum of Understanding  (MoU):
2-1 - the UKPS Board Members hereby agree that the CAIRN Euro-/Asian Postgraduate Curriculum Development Project is hereby created at the UKPS (including all modules linked to the ICT-/VLE Multimedia Database System Training for Development Studies, Psychology, Philosophy, Humanitarian Assistance and Counselling Intervention), to develop postgraduate certificates and diplomas options under the EU ECTS/ECDL credits, and within the Asia-Link project reconfiguration entitled : ...
2.2 - while the UKPS selected Board Members will duly represent the CAIRN Project in the area and disciplines chosen, William R Leon will be Acting Director of CAIRN in KTM and the EU, including all necessary coordination, negotiation, secretariat, production, supervision and training. William R LEON will be integrated in the UKPS Board under status of visiting scholar and training advisor.
2.3 - Based upon the extend of the joint-academic activities to be envisioned, including CAIRN experiential seminars, conferences and other documentary videos production to be decided, some options for further networking with other London interested parties will be decided by the UKPS Board in London, within quality professional promotion outputs and PR allowing this project credibility, efficacy and relevance in joint-activities with partners. This includes Seminar in Y2005-06.
2.4 -  The general aims and activities of  the UKPS and CAIRN Consortium collaboration will be :
A - ECTS/ECDL POSTGRAUATE and PROFESSIONAL THESIS (PD) ACCREDITATION: In the first period of Year 2006, these will focus on courses online, field-research and seminars relevant to the UKPS and CAIRN joint-project, including the ECDL/ECTS credits for joint-curricula Online System Management and a special focus on Experiential Seminars, Online Courses and Conferences in selected areas, ie: Tibetan Tsa-rLung Psychology & Energotherapy.
B- The partners will develop later further ECTS/ECDL Postgraduate Certificates options to be agreed upon, this in direct relation with Health Anthropology, Ethno-medicine, Clinical Anthropology, Development Studies, Crisis Prevention, Philosophy, Himalayan Current Issues, Tibetan Medicine, Arts and Humanities, etc... Such curriculum accreditation will require tasks including design, organization and management of options, these to be accessible either through courses online, online tutorial, videos, conferences, seminars and field-research in situ (Nepal).
C- The registration of students and researchers in this programme will remain an area under each of the partner geographical area and legal juridiction, in order to comply with the academic, legal and logistics prior-conditions of legally granting ECTS/ECDL Certification in the EU and in Asia.
2.5 - Further administrative modalities and programme details will be finalized in the annexes.
 

Article 3 - Duration of Contract
The duration of this contract is valid for 5 years, to be under annual evaluation by CAIRN and UKPS Executive Board. CAIRN HQ is based at the UCL/ANSO/LAAP in UCL/LLN Belgium.

Dr David Moiso:
Bruno Bocchio:                                                                      R.W. Leon:
Mr. Jonothon Boulter:                                                                

Date & place of signature: ........................, ..........                  2005
 


END/SAMPLE